Dry Ice FAQs

If you’ve got a question about dry ice, find the answers you need here



Answer:

Stored in a 25-quart cooler, dry ice sublimates at a rate of 10 pounds every 24 hours.

Answer:

Use 10 to 15 pounds of dry ice per day in a standard 25-quart cooler. For use during emergencies such as power outages, use 1.5 pounds of dry ice per cubic foot of freezer space.

Answer:

No. Dry ice placed in water will sublimate through the water, producing a fog effect.

Answer:

It’s possible to make dry ice at home, but much safer and more cost effective to purchase Penguin Brand Dry Ice from your local retailer.

Answer:

Dry ice can crack glass, but plastic is generally safe to use.

Answer:

Place any unused dry ice in an open, well-ventilated area inside a cooler or paper bag or just set it outdoors away from children or pets. It will sublimate in a short amount of time.

Answer:

No. Dry ice is the solid state of carbon dioxide. Safer to use and easier to come by, dry ice is commonly considered a better option than liquid nitrogen for personal projects and in-home use.


Answer:

Dry ice “disappears” through a process known as sublimation, in which a substance transitions from a solid state to a gaseous state. It’s not really disappearing—it’s becoming CO2 gas and dispersing into the air around it.

Answer:

Dry ice is formed by compressing liquid carbon dioxide (CO2) into a solid form. Dry ice is approximately -109.3°F (-78.5°C) and is used primarily for refrigeration, providing approximately 245 BTUs per pound. Dry ice is a natural medium that serves many industries and applications. The properties of dry ice make it a perfect tool for freezing, stabilizing, preparing and shipping items in temperatures as low as -109.3°F (-78.5°C). Companies prefer to use dry ice because of its cooling factor and lack of water or residue.